Why Is My Knee Locking

Why Is My Knee Locking?

Kneecap: A soft pad used to protect the kneecap from injury or trauma. The term “kneecap” refers to any hard protective covering over the top of your kneecap. These pads are made of various materials such as leather, plastic, foam, etc. They may be used for protection against falls or other injuries.

Locked Knee: A condition where the joint cannot move freely due to tight muscles and ligaments.

The Locked Knee Condition: An injury that occurs when there is excessive tension on one side of the joint (usually the front) and insufficient flexibility in another area (the back).

Pseudo Knee Locking: When a person locks their knees while standing.

Sitting Down Lockout: A position in which the body is held rigidly upright with the legs straight out in front and arms at sides. The feet are placed flat on the floor. This position is commonly known as a “sit down.” It is often associated with sitting because it requires no movement of the hips or torso.

What Is A Locked Knee: A condition in which the knee joint does not allow full flexion or extension of the knee.

Why Is My Knee Locking: A condition that can occur when the muscles and tendons around the knee become so tight that they prevent the knee from bending.

Contracting The Quads: Using your quads to hold your foot up at your butt.

Do-It-Yourself Knee Locking: Using your body or a part of it to lock your knee for you.

How To Lock A Knee: This involves locking a knee yourself so that you do not have to move the joint or put weight on it.

I Knee Locked: Said in instances where a person’s knee cannot be flexed at all without assistance.

How To Unlock A Knee: This involves unlocking a knee yourself so that you do not have to move the joint or put weight on it.

Knee Locking Exercises: An exercise in which the muscles around the knee are tightened to create resistance against motion at the joint.

Locked Knee Treatment: A condition where the knee is unable to be moved from a flexed position. This is also known as a locked knee.

Locked Knee Stretches: A stretch in which the muscles are pushed into the bone to allow them to be extended further than normal under tension. This is also known as a locked knee stretch.

Progressive Locked Knee Stretches: Stretches where you push the limits of your flexibility slowly and cautiously, or over time, without risking injury by stretching too far.

Unlocked Knee Stretches: Stretches where you push the limits of your flexibility slowly and cautiously, or over time, without risking injury by stretching too far.

Why Is My Knee Unlocking: A condition that can occur when the muscles and tendons around the knee become so tight that they prevent the knee from bending.

Calves

The calf is the muscle on the back of your lower leg. It is used for pushing off with, such as when you walk, run, or jump.

Anklebone: Portion of the skeleton that is connected to and protects the ankle.

Achilles Tendon: Tendon that connects your heel to your calf. It is the largest tendon in the body.

Bunions: A swollen bump on the bone that projects at the base of the big toe.

Calf Muscle: Muscle that works with the shin bone to move your foot up and down.

Calf Muscle Stretches: Stretches where you pull your toes back toward your shin.

Calf Muscle Weakness: A condition in which the calf muscles are not strong enough to support the body’s weight.

Calves Pumped: When your calves, or the muscles on the back of your lower legs, feel as if they have the blood “pumped” into them, usually as a result of exercise.

Flat-footed: Having a foot that is low to the ground and a arch that is either lacking or collapsed.

Gout: A medical condition in which uric acid crystals form deposits in the joints, causing severe pain.

Hamstring Pull: A condition in which the hamstring muscle, located on the back of the thigh, is torn. This is also known as a pulled hamstring.

Heel Grip: A piece of equipment worn inside a shoe to prevent the foot from slipping inward.

High-Arched Feet: Having feet that are high off the ground and arches that are either lacking or collapsed.

How To Do Ankle Exercises: An exercise in which the muscles around your ankle are tightened to create resistance against motion at the joint.

Ibuprofen: A drug used to reduce pain, swelling, and fever. It also reduces inflammation.

Jogger’s Nodules: A medical condition in which the Achilles tendon, located on the back of the ankle, becomes swollen and painful. This is also known as Jogger’s Nodes.

Jump To It!: A phrase that means to move quickly from one movement to the next in a fast manner.

Knee Lift: An exercise in which the muscles around your knee are tightened to create resistance against motion at the joint.

Neuroma: A benign tumor-like growth on a nerve. It most commonly occurs in the foot.

Overpronation: The rolling inward of the foot as it moves through the walking cycle. This can cause strain on the muscles and tendons of the foot, leg, and back.

Plantar Fasciitis: A condition in which the thick tissue that connects the heel to the toes, located at the bottom of the foot, becomes painful and inflamed.

Quadriceps: The muscles on the front of the upper leg. It is used to straighten the knee and leg.

Shin Splints: A condition in which muscle pain occurs along the front of the lower leg. This is also known as Medial Tibial Pain Syndrome.

Shoe Heel: The back part of a shoe that touches the ground.

Straight-Legged Deadlift: An exercise in which the muscles of the back and legs are tightened to create resistance against motion at the joint.

The Wall Stretch: A stretching exercise in which you put one arm against a wall, lean into it, and pull the shoulder down and back. This is also known as a “Baseball Stretch.”

Tibialis Anterior: The long, narrow muscle on the front of your lower leg. This muscle turns the foot in and helps lift the foot.

Toning Exercises: A type of exercise that strengthens the muscles without increasing their size.

Torticollis: A condition in which one shoulder is permanently higher than the other as a result of muscle imbalance. This is also known as “Crick in the Neck.”

Achilles Tendon: The thickest and strongest tendon in the body. It connects the calf muscles to the back of the heel.

Arthritis: A medical condition in which the joints, especially those at the ends of bones, become inflamed and causes pain and swelling.

Bursitis: A painful inflammation of the bursa located near a joint. This is also known as “Hot Spot.”

Heel Lift: A device worn inside a shoe to reduce the slope of the foot. This reduces strain on the Achilles tendon and prevents or reduces heel pain.

Running: A type of exercise in which you travel on foot at a fast pace for a long distance.

Stride: One step in the process of running.

Stride Length: The distance from one foot touching the ground to the other foot touching the ground.

Tendon: A cord-like structure that connects a muscle to another structure, such as a bone.

Trampoline: A device used for jumping into the air. This is also known as a “Rebounder.”

Walking: A type of exercise in which you travel on foot at a moderate pace for a short distance.

Zipper: A device that connects two slingshot bands together.

Zone 1,2,3: This is a method of training to improve endurance through cardiovascular exercises. When you exercise in this manner, you begin at a low intensity and gradually increase the intensity. You repeat this procedure until you reach a high intensity level, then you gradually decrease the intensity back to a low level. This high-low pattern is referred to as a “Zoned” workout.

Muscle: A bundle of tissue that can contract in order to move bodily structures. Muscle tissue is comprised of cells and fibers. There are three types of muscle tissue: cardiac, smooth, and skeletal (also known as voluntary). Skeletal muscle is attached to bone by connective tissue (known as tendon) at one end and attaches to skin or other structures at the other end.

When skeletal muscles contract, the skin or other structures move according to the direction of the pull.

Abdominal Muscles: A group of muscles that run vertically along the abdominal wall. These muscles are used for stabilization purposes. They also assist in respiration.

Acetabular Fossa: A shallow cup in the pelvic bone that partially surrounds the head of the thigh bone (femur).

Acromioclavicular Joint: The meeting place of the acromion process and the clavicle (collarbone). This is a pivotal joint in the shoulder area.

Adductors: A group of muscles that move the thigh inward. These muscles are found inside the thighs.

Apex: The uppermost part of the lung.

Aponeurosis: A flat, tendinous sheet that attaches muscles to other structures.

Articular Cartilage: A smooth material that covers the ends of some bones in a joint. This protects the bones from friction when moved across one another.

Auricle: See “Ear.”

Axilla: The space or tissues located under the arms. It contains a network of veins and lymph nodes.

Axillary Furrow: The fold of skin located under the arms.

Biceps Muscle: A muscle that attaches to the upper arm bone and allows you to bend your forearm.

Blowout: A sudden injury to the stomach wall that creates a hole. This often results from extended overeating or from violent vomiting (eructation).

Blood Vessels: Tissues that carry blood throughout the body.

Body Cavity: A space in the body which contains organs. There are several major body cavities:

Cranial cavity: The space inside the skull.

Pelvic cavity: The space inside the pelvic bones which contains most of the reproductive system.

Peritoneal cavity: The space inside the walls of the abdomen which surrounds the stomach and some of the intestines.

Bones: Metamorphosed cartilage. They provide stable support for our bodies.

Brain: The command center of the nervous system. It is located inside the cranium (skull).

Carpal Bones: Eight small bones that form the wrist.

Cartilage: A flexible but strong connective tissue. It has little flexibility in comparison to bone and no flexibility in comparison to ligaments. Cartilage is present at the ends of long bones to protect the bone marrow and allow for smooth movements. It is also present in the ears and nose.

Cells: The smallest unit of living things. All people are comprised of many different types of cells. The cells have different functions and require specific conditions for optimal performance.

Cell Wall: The outer layer of a cell. It is designed to protect the cell from its environment and other cells. Cell walls are especially important for plant cells as they can’t move to avoid danger or obtain nutrients and oxygen.

Cerebellum: The “little brain,” it is located under the occipital and temporal lobes at the back of the skull. It integrates sensory information, such as balance, position, and movement.

Cerebral Hemorrhage: Bleeding within the brain that can occur for many reasons (such as high blood pressure) but is most often caused by weak blood vessels.

Cerebral Spinal Fluid: The liquid inside the brain and spinal cord. It surrounds and protects these vital parts of the central nervous system.

Cerebrum: The largest part of the brain, found in the front of the skull. It is responsible for thought, memory, speech, and other higher functions of the nervous system.

Clavicle: See “Sternum.”

Clitoris: A small, sensitive organ located near the female genitals.

Colon: Part of the large intestine, contains many useful bacteria and absorbs much of the water from your feces.

Concave: Curving inward. For example, the inside of a bowl is concave, whereas the outside of a bowl is convex.

Condyle: One of the round knobs that protrude from a bone at a joint.

Connective Tissue: A type of tissue that connects and supports other tissues and organs in the body. There are three types:

Adipose Tissue: Storage fat. It is found between organs, around organs (such as the visceral fat surrounding the heart), in bone (as in bone marrow) and in the skin (as in the fatty layer under the skin).

Cartilage: Redskin-like flexible but strong connective tissue that provides support and protection. It is flexible yet strong, like rubber.

Bone: The hard connective tissue that forms the skeleton. It provides protection and support and is very strong, unlike cartilage.

Coronal Suture: Joins the two parietal bones at the top of the skull.

Crepuscular: Active primarily during twilight (such as wolves).

Diaphragm: The primary muscle used in breathing. It is a thin, circular muscle located beneath the lungs and stomach. Contraction results in the stomach moving outward, which in turn pushes the lungs downward, creating empty space for air to enter. It is also connected to the ribs, allowing it to contract and relax them to move air in and out of the lungs.

Diurnal: Active primarily during daylight hours (such as humans).

Dura Mater: One of the meninges, it surrounds the brain and spinal cord. It is very thick to protect these parts of the central nervous system.

Encephalon: See “Brain.”

Endocrine Glands: Glands that release hormones into the blood instead of exterior secretions. They have a broad effect on the body rather than a specific part, as with exocrine glands. There are many endocrine glands, including the pituitary, pineal, thymus, thyroid, and parathyroid glands.

Epiglottis: A flap of cartilage that covers the windpipe during swallowing to prevent food from entering and getting stuck in the larynx (or windpipe).

Eustachian Tube: A tube connecting the middle ear to the back of the nose. Its function is to equalize the pressure on either side of the eardrum, allowing it to function efficiently.

Exocrine Glands: Glands that release chemicals for absorption externally rather than into the blood stream. These are also known as “sweat glands” and “sebaceous glands.” There are many types, including the mammary glands (in females), the meolacles (in males), and the sebaceous glands (all over the body).

Falx Cerebri: A thin, double fold of dura mater that separates the left and right cerebral hemispheres of the brain.

Femur: The largest bone in the human body, it is located in the upper leg. It is the only bone in the thigh that is connected to the hip bone, and the only bone in the human body that connects to only one bone.

Fibula: The inner, slightly smaller leg bone that is connected to the knee and foot.

Foramen Magnum: The large opening in the front of the skull that allows the passage of nerves and blood vessels such as the carotid arteries and jugular veins.

Frontal Lobe: The frontmost part of the cerebral cortex. It is involved in higher mental activities such as motor control, learning, and memory.

Gastrocnemius: The “calf” muscle connecting the femur to the heel, which is its firm connection to the foot.

Gluteus Maximus: The largest of the gluteal muscles. Also known as the “gluteus,” it is located in the buttocks.

Gray Matter: Areas of the brain that are made up of nerve cells and other cells that serve as processors. Grey in color, these areas include the cerebral cortex which covers most of the outer surface of the cerebrum.

Hip Bone: Also known as the “coxal bone,” three of these bones connect the legs to the pelvic girdle. The main bone is located in the front, with two smaller bones on either side.

Humerus: The outer bone in the upper arm, it is connected to the shoulder and the elbow.

Internal Jugular Vein: The vein that drains deoxygenated blood from the brain back to the heart. It is one of the major veins in the body and can be found just above the throat, alongside the trachea (windpipe).

Intervertebral Disk: Also known as a “disk,” these pads of cartilage sit between each of the vertebrae in the spinal column. They absorb shock and keep the vertebrae separated, preventing bruising of the spinal cord.

Labium Majorum: The “labia majora” is a separate section of skin that fuses to the labia minora. Together, these formations create the hood-shaped formation containing the clitoris and the vaginal opening.

Labium Minora: The “labia minora” are two folds of skin that sit on either side of the labia majora. Together with the labia majora, they create a hood-shaped formation containing the clitoris and the vaginal opening.

Labium Transversum: The “labia transversum” is a separate section of skin that fuses to the labia majora and the labia minora. It forms the base of the hood-shaped formation containing the clitoris and the vaginal opening.

Lacrimal Bones: The “tear duct” bones that surround the eye socket, they are located just below and lateral to the eyes.

Lap Chole: Another name for the liver, it is located in the upper right portion of the abdomen.

Larynx: Also known as the “voice box,” it is located in the throat. The larynx contains the “voice box” where we produce sound, and it also contains the glottis, which is a small opening that closes over the trachea (windpipe) to prevent objects from entering.

Lens: The transparent “window” of the eye, it focuses light on the retina at the back of the eye.

Ligament: Strong bands of fibrous tissue that connect bone to bone or cartilage to bone, providing stability to the skeletal system.

Mandible: The “lower jawbone,” it forms the front part of the jaw and contains teeth sockets in its upper portion.

Maxilla: The “upper jawbone,” it is located on the other side of the face from the mandible and also contains teeth sockets in its upper portion.

Sources & references used in this article:

Painful knee locking caused by gouty tophi successfully treated with allopurinol by S Chatterjee, H Ilaslan – Nature Clinical Practice Rheumatology, 2008 – nature.com

Automatic knee-locking device by HW Sprouls – US Patent 2,071,711, 1937 – Google Patents

In vivo deterioration of tibial baseplate locking mechanisms in contemporary modular total knee components by GA Engh, S Lounici, AR Rao, MB Collier – JBJS, 2001 – journals.lww.com

The diagnostic value of the stump impingement reflex sign for determining anterior cruciate ligament stump impingement as a cause of knee locking by MR Carmont, RE Gilbert… – Sports …, 2012 – bmcsportsscimedrehabil …

Extruded osteochondral nail: an interesting cause of knee locking by RE MARCUS, WE ALBERS… – … and Related Research®, 1981 – journals.lww.com

Passive walking with knees by T McGeer – … ., IEEE International Conference on Robotics and …, 1990 – ieeexplore.ieee.org

Locking knee joint for artificial limbs and orthopedic braces by CV Smith – US Patent 2,594,227, 1952 – Google Patents

Disengagement of a locking screw from a modular stem in revision total knee arthroplasty. A report of three cases by GH Westrich, C Hidaka, RE Windsor – JBJS, 1997 – journals.lww.com

Treating patella fractures with a locking patella plate-first clinical results by S Wurm, V Bühren, P Augat – Injury, 2018 – Elsevier