The 9 Healthiest Types of Cheese

The 9 Healthiest Types of Cheese:

1) Cheddar – A mild cheddar cheese with a creamy texture and rich flavor.

It’s a great choice for sandwiches or as a dip for crackers. You can buy it at most grocery stores, but if you’re lucky enough to live near one of those fancy deli counters where they sell artisanal cheeses, then go get yourself some! (I’m looking at you New York City! I’ll take my chances with the local bodega!)

2) Swiss – A soft white cheddar cheese that’s delicious on its own or mixed into other foods like hummus, falafel, or even pizza.

It’s a little harder to find than regular cheddar, so look out for it when you shop.

3) Gruyere – A classic red French cheese made from cow’s milk and aged for up to two years before being sold.

It’s often used in sauces and stews.

4) Monterey Jack – An American white cheddar cheese that comes from cows raised on California farms.

It has a very smooth texture and a strong flavor.

5) Colby – A mild yellow cheddar cheese that’s popular in restaurants because it melts well, but also makes an excellent spread for dips or dressings.

6) Parmesan – A sharp Italian white cheddar cheese with a distinctive taste and aroma.

A little bit goes a long way, and it’s an ingredient you’ll find in many Italian dishes.

7) Gruyere – A milder Swiss cheese made from cow’s milk.

It has a sweet but slightly salty flavor that goes well with just about any type of sandwich meat or vegetable.

8) Manchego – A Spanish sheep’s milk cheese that’s slightly salty and has a firm consistency.

It goes well with fruits and nuts, or you can eat it on its own as a snack.

9) Halloumi – A squeaky cheese that holds its shape and texture when cooked.

It’s traditionally made from goat’s or sheep’s milk, but sometimes made from cow’s milk as well. Overcook it, and it becomes crispy like a cracker. It’s delicious in salads, on sandwiches, or just on its own.

These are the healthiest types of cheese.

Which one is your favorite?

Let us know in the comments!

Does mozzarella cheese healthy?

Mozzarella is one of the world’s most popular cheeses. It comes from the Italian word “mozzare,” which means “to cut off” – a reference to the method used to make this cheese, where the curds are literally cut off from the main block of Cheddar cheese. Mozzarella is mostly water and has a low fat content. It has a mild flavor, and can be used in a wide variety of dishes.

What are the health benefits of mozzarella?

Some of the nutrients found in mozzarella include:

Protein: Cheese is high in protein, which builds and repairs body tissue and helps maintain muscle mass. Protein also helps prevent overeating by curbing your appetite, making you feel full.

Calcium: This mineral is essential for building and maintaining healthy bones and teeth. Calcium also helps prevent high blood pressure, hypertension, and osteoporosis.

Moisture: Cheese is over 70% water, which is essential for keeping skin, hair, and nails healthy. Water also helps eliminate toxins from the body and helps regulate body temperature.

How is mozzarella produced?

The process of making mozzarella starts with pasteurizing milk and adding rennet, an enzyme that comes from the stomach of calves. The milk is then coagulated into curds, which are squeezed and stretched to release moisture. The mixture is then cut up and warmed again so that it can be molded into the familiar ball shape. Mozzarella is often smoked or charred to give it a tasty flavor.

How is mozzarella different from other types of cheese?

Mozzarella is a type of pasta filata, which means “stretched paste.” The most famous kind of pasta filata is the stringy Italian cheese called provolone. Mozzarella is also similar to scamorza, an Italian cheese traditionally used in the making of pizza.

How to eat?

Mozzarella can be eaten on its own or used as a topping for pizza and other Italian dishes. It can be eaten on its own as a quick, high-protein snack.

Interesting facts

Mozzarella is traditionally made from the milk of water buffaloes, although these days it’s also made from cow’s milk. The name comes from the Italian word mozzare, which means “to cut off,” a reference to the method of shaping mozzarella by cutting and stretching the curd.

What does mozzarella taste like?

This delicate cheese has a mild flavor and a soft, creamy texture. It has a slightly milky taste and is slightly salty.

How to store?

Mozzarella should be stored in the refrigerator for no more than one week. Keep cut pieces of mozzarella wrapped in plastic wrap to prevent it from drying out.

Cook with it?

Mozzarella can be eaten as is or used to top a variety of dishes. It’s an essential ingredient on traditional Italian pizza, and also goes well with pasta dishes.

Mozzarella cheese pairs well with these ingredients:

Basil

Tomatoes

Olives

Sun-dried tomatoes

Parsley

Oregano

Garlic

Olive oil

Peppers

Learn more about cheese here.

Sources & references used in this article:

Strategies to develop healthier processed cheeses: Reduction of sodium and fat contents and use of prebiotics by LL Ferrão, EB Silva, HLA Silva, R Silva… – Food Research …, 2016 – Elsevier

Effect of fat reduction on chemical composition, proteolysis, functionality, and yield of Mozzarella cheese by MA Rudan, DM Barbano, JJ Yun, PS Kindstedt – Journal of dairy science, 1999 – Elsevier

Comparison of the fatty acid profiles in cheeses from ewes fed diets supplemented with different plant oils by R Bodas, T Manso, AR Mantecon… – Journal of Agricultural …, 2010 – ACS Publications

The availability and cost of healthier food alternatives by KM Jetter, DL Cassady – American journal of preventive medicine, 2006 – Elsevier

Investigation of multidrug-resistant Salmonella serotype Typhimurium DT104 infections linked to raw-milk cheese in Washington State by RG Villar, MD Macek, S Simons, PS Hayes, MJ Goldoft… – Jama, 1999 – jamanetwork.com

Nudging and social marketing techniques encourage employees to make healthier food choices: a randomized controlled trial in 30 worksite cafeterias in The … by E Velema, EL Vyth, T Hoekstra… – The American Journal …, 2018 – academic.oup.com