Everything You Need to Know About Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a common skin condition affecting over one billion people worldwide. It is characterized by red, scaly patches that are usually located on the trunk or extremities (hands, feet, face). These patches may appear anywhere from mildly raised to large and deeply pitted. They are sometimes referred to as “plaque psoriasis.” Plaque psoriasis can occur at any age but tends to develop most frequently during childhood and adolescence. There are several different types of plaque psoriasis:

Plaque psoriasis due to environmental factors (environmental triggers)

Plaque psoriasis due to genetic predisposition (genetic risk factors)

Plaque psoriasis due to stress (stressful life events)

The exact cause(s) of plaque psoriasis is not known. However, it is believed that there are three main factors involved in causing plaque psoriasis: 1. UV radiation 2. Stress 3.

Inherited genes.

Although there is no evidence that psoriasis treatments work, some studies have shown that psoriatic medications may reduce the severity of plaque psoriasis and improve quality of life. Some researchers believe that certain drugs used to treat other diseases such as cancer may also prove effective against plaque psoriasis, however further research is needed before these conclusions can be made fully valid.

Oral medicines

Calcipotriene (Dovonex)

Calcipotriene is a form of vitamin D that improves skin scaling and inflammation in patients with plaque psoriasis. It is available as an ointment or a scalp application. The most common side effect of this medication is skin irritation at the site of application. Calcipotriene can increase your chances of getting skin cancer; sunblock should be used during treatment.

Calcium dobesilate (Foss)

Calcium dobesilate is available as a tablet and improves skin symptoms in patients with plaque psoriasis. The most common side effect of this medication is stomach pain. Calcium dobesilate should not be taken by people who have kidney disease or a certain type of heart problems. Calcium dobesilate should not be taken for longer than a year as it can cause bone problems.

Clobetasol (Temovate)

Clobetasol is a very potent steroid that is available as an ointment, foam, or shampoo to reduce skin inflammation and scaling in patients with plaque psoriasis. The most common side effects of clobetasol are skin irritations at the site of application. Clobetasol should not be used on the face, armpits, or genital area. Clobetasol should not be used for prolonged periods as it can cause multiple side effects.

Clocortolone (Cortaid)

Clocortolone is a mild steroid that helps reduce skin inflammation and scaling in patients with plaque psoriasis. The most common side effect of clocortolone is skin irritation at the site of application. Clocortolone should not be used on the face, armpits, or genital area. Clocortolone should not be used for prolonged periods as it can cause multiple side effects.

Flurandrenolide (Cordran)

Flurandrenolide is a medium strength steroid that is used to treat patients with plaque psoriasis. This medication is available as an ointment or a scalp application. The most common side effects of flurandrenolide are skin irritation at the site of application. Flurandrenolide should not be used on the face, armpits, or genital area.

Flurandrenolide should not be used for prolonged periods as it can cause multiple side effects.

Mometasone (Elocon)

Mometasone is a medium strength steroid that improves skin symptoms in patients with plaque psoriasis. The most common side effect of mometasone is skin irritation at the site of application. Mometasone should not be used on the face, armpits, or genital area. Mometasone should not be used for prolonged periods as it can cause multiple side effects.

Tacrolimus (Protopic)

Tacrolimus is a medication that works by decreasing the body’s immune system response. It is used by patients who have moderate to severe plaque psoriasis who are not responding to other systemic treatments. The most common side effect of this medication is a burning, itching, and tingling sensation of the skin. Other side effects may also occur.

Tacrolimus should not be used by patients who are allergic to tacrolimus, or with kidney disease.

Tacrolimus is also available as a 0.03% ointment (Protopic).

Some of the more common side effects of calcipotriene are local reactions at the application site such as redness, burning, and itching. Calcipotriene is a safe treatment that is usually well-tolerated.

Some of the more common side effects of clobetasol propionate are local skin reactions at the application site such as redness, burning, and itching. Clobetasol propionate is a safe treatment that is usually well-tolerated.

Some of the more common side effects of flurandrenolide are local skin reactions at the application site such as redness, burning, and itching. Flurandrenolide is a safe treatment that is usually well-tolerated.

Some of the more common side effects of halobetasol propionate are local skin reactions at the application site such as redness, burning, and itching. Halobetasol propionate is a safe treatment that is usually well-tolerated.

Sources & references used in this article:

Everything You Need to Know About Psoriasis: Etiology, Causes, Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, Treatment, Prevention, Long-term Monitoring, etc. by H SABOOWALA – 2020 – books.google.com

What should undergraduate medical students know about psoriasis? Involving patients in curriculum development: modified Delphi technique by A Alahlafi, S Burge – Bmj, 2005 – bmj.com

What you should know about psoriasis by D Hanson, PA Thompson, D Langemo, S Hunter… – …, 2008 – journals.lww.com

The biomechanical link between skin and joint disease in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: what every dermatologist needs to know by D McGonagle, AL Tan, M Benjamin – 2008 – ard.bmj.com

The psychological sequelae of psoriasis: results of a qualitative study by P Magin, J Adams, G Heading, D Pond… – Psychology, health & …, 2009 – Taylor & Francis