All About Stress Fractures of the Shin

What Is A Stress Fracture Of The Shin?

A stress fracture of the shin is a bone injury that occurs when there is trauma to the bones in one area. It may occur during sports activities such as running, jumping, climbing stairs, etc. It may also happen due to falls from high places such as buildings or other tall structures.

Symptoms Of A Stress Fracture Of The Shin:

Painful pain in the shin (or any part of the body) that lasts longer than 3 weeks. Pain may radiate up into the foot and ankle.

The pain may be worse at night, or it may not occur at all. If you are unable to sleep because of the pain, then you probably have a stress fracture of your shin.

The most common symptom is pain in the shin. Other possible symptoms include swelling, redness, tenderness and/or weakness of the affected leg(s).

You may experience fatigue or loss of energy.

Treatment For A Stress Fracture Of The Shin:

If you suffer from a stress fracture of your shin, then you need to see a doctor immediately. Your doctor will take x-rays and perform an examination.

He or she will determine the underlying cause of your shin pain and then suggest a treatment plan.

The treatment depends on the underlying cause of your shin pain. If there is a stress fracture in your shin, then you will be advised to wear a medical boot for 6-8 weeks.

Your doctor may also prescribe certain over-the-counter or prescription pain medications for relief.

Sources & references used in this article:

Magnetic resonance imaging in stress fractures and shin splints. by Y Aoki, K Yasuda, H Tohyama, H Ito… – … and Related Research …, 2004 – journals.lww.com

Stress fractures of the tibia in athletes or” shin soreness” by MB Devas – The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery …, 1958 – online.boneandjoint.org.uk

Overuse injuries: tendinopathies, stress fractures, compartment syndrome, and shin splints by RP Wilder, S Sethi – Clinics in sports medicine, 2004 – media.gradebuddy.com

Incidence of trauma related stress fractures and shin splints in male and female army recruits: retrospective case study by MA Macleod, AS Houston, L Sanders… – Bmj, 1999 – bmj.com

Interpretation and classification of bone scintigraphic findings in stress fractures by ST Zwas, R Elkanovitch, G Frank – Journal of Nuclear Medicine, 1987 – Citeseer