What to Expect from Varicocelectomy

What to expect from varicocelectomy?

The most common reason why people undergo varicocele surgery is because they have had a large inguinal hernia or other congenital condition which causes their intestines to protrude into the abdomen. These types of conditions are usually treated with surgery. However, if the problem does not require surgical intervention then it may be possible to treat it with a simple procedure called varicocelectomy.

Varicocelectomy is a medical term used to refer to removal of part or all of the veins supplying blood supply to the veins supplying blood supply to the veins supplying blood supply to any vein.

A varicocele is a collection of fluid in one or both testicles (or both) due either to infection, injury, or trauma. A varicocele can occur anywhere along the urethra, but most commonly occurs near the junction between bladder and rectum.

In some cases, a varicocele may be caused by cancer cells growing in the veins supplying blood to the veins supplying blood to the veins.

Another type of varicocele is called a spermatic cord compression. Spermatogenesis is the production of new eggs within the ovaries. When this happens, there will be no more egg production and therefore no more pregnancy. If left untreated, this condition can lead to infertility or even death.

A Telaventricular shunt (or high pressure connection) is a condition in which blood bypasses the veins, resulting in higher pressures in the arteries than in the veins.

Although a varicocele can be detected by physical exam through a varicocele or “swollen vein” in the scrotum, it can also be detected through ultrasound scanning.

A “sluggish” left renal vein is a condition in which the left renal vein does not properly drain blood from near the left kidney, causing high blood pressure in that area.

A “sluggish” right renal vein is a condition in which the right renal vein does not properly drain blood from near the right kidney, causing high blood pressure in that area.

A right testicular vein obstruction is a condition in which one or both of the veins that drain the blood from the testes (the male reproductive glands) become clogged, resulting in high blood pressure in one or both of the testicles.

Sources & references used in this article:

Laparoscopic varicocelectomy: preliminary report of a new technique by PG Hagood, DJ Mehan, JH Worischeck… – The Journal of …, 1992 – auajournals.org

Preoperative semen analysis as a predictor of seminal improvement following varicocelectomy by TG Matkov, M Zenni, J Sandlow, LA Levine – Fertility and sterility, 2001 – Elsevier

Single‐port laparoscopic surgery: initial experience in children for varicocelectomy by JH Kaouk, JS Palmer – BJU international, 2008 – Wiley Online Library

The adolescent varicocele I: left testicular hypertrophy following varicocelectomy by AB GERSHBEIN, M HOROWITZ… – The Journal of …, 1999 – auajournals.org

Time to improvement in semen parameters after microsurgical varicocelectomy in men with severe oligospermia by TA Masterson, AB Greer… – Canadian Urological …, 2019 – ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

Laparoscopic versus subinguinal varicocelectomy: a comparative study by E Enquist, BS Stein, M Sigman – Fertility and sterility, 1994 – Elsevier

The impact of internal spermatic artery ligation during laparoscopic varicocelectomy on recurrence rate and short post operative outcome by S Kattan – Scandinavian journal of urology and nephrology, 2001 – Taylor & Francis