Thin Penis: 23 Things to Know About Size, Sex, and More

1)

How big are you?

The average adult male’s erect length (penis circumference) is approximately 5 inches at its thickest point and 3.5 inches at its thinnest point. The average adult female’s erect length (vagina circumference) is approximately 4.25 inches at its thickest point and 2.75 inches at its thinnest point. [Source]

2)

What does it mean if I say my erection is “thin”?

A thin erection means that the head of your member is not as long or thick as it could be. If you have a large erection, then your body may try to compensate by making your pubic bone larger so that when you stand up straight, your pelvis will look smaller than it actually is. When you sit down or lie down, the pelvis becomes less prominent because it doesn’t fill out like other parts of the body do. A thin erection can also result from an enlarged prostate gland, which makes the blood vessels there narrower.

3)

What does it mean if I say my erection is “large?”

Large erections are usually caused by excess testosterone levels in men. Testosterone causes the testicles to produce more testosterone, which leads to enlargement of both the scrotum and testes. Large erections can also occur due to an enlarged prostate gland, which makes blood vessels there wider.

4)

What does it mean if I say my erection is “bumpy?”

Bumpy penises have a lot of veins that are very close to the skin’s surface. These bumps can be felt when touched lightly and can sometimes be seen by others, but only when light hits them at the right angle.

5)

What does it mean if I say my erection is “bent?”

A bent or curved erection is a result of Peyronie’s Disease, which is a buildup of plaque inside the erectile tissue. This buildup causes scarring which makes the tissue harder and more difficult to bend. The plaque can be treated with medicine, surgery, or a combination of both.

6)

What does it mean if I say my erection points “down?”

Most men’s penises point slightly downward when they are flaccid. This is nothing to worry about. However, if your member points downward at the tip when it is erect, then you may have something called chordee. Chordee is a condition where the tunica albuginea (a thick fibrous sheath) of the head of your member does not fully cover the head and moves downward, pulling the glans along with it. While chordee can occur in newborns due to the hormones in the womb not yet having determined its final position, it is more common that it occurs later on in life due to Peyronie’s disease.

7)

What does it mean if I say my erection points “up?”

If your member points upward when it is flaccid then you are very lucky! When most men’s penises point downward at the tip when they are erect, yours points upward. This is perfectly normal and it is most likely due to a difference in the hormones your mother was exposed to while she was pregnant with you. It can also occur if you have a large amount of testosterone or if your body starts producing less of the hormone that causes the erection to bend downward.

8)

What does it mean if my erection bends to the left or right?

Most men’s penises bend slightly to one side when they are erect. However, if your member bends a lot during an erection then you may have Peyronie’s Disease. If you do have this condition, you also may be experiencing pain while your member is erect. The plaque buildup causes scarring and fibrosis of the tunica albuginea (a thick fibrous sheath), which results in a rigid and inflexible erection.

9)

What does it mean if my erection is “warped?”

Your erection is considered “warped” when it has an unusual bend or curve. You may have Peyronie’s disease, a birth defect, or a combination of the two. If you suffer from this deformity, you may also experience pain during an erection and should see your doctor immediately.

10)

What does it mean if my erection is “crooked?”

Your member is considered “crooked” when, when flaccid, it points nearly toward your hip rather than straight ahead or slightly up. This may be due to a condition called chordee, which is a result of the tunica albuginea (a thick fibrous sheath) of the glans not extending over the glans completely and covering only the top side of it. When the glans is pulled downward by the pudendal artery and suspensory ligament, the glans bends toward the side where the tunica does not cover.

11)

What does it mean if my erection changes shape?

There are several reasons why your member may change in shape or bend from its usual position. These can include:

1) You may be suffering from Peyronie’s disease, a build up of plaque inside the tunica albuginea (a thick fibrous sheath), which causes scarring and bending.

2) You may have scar tissue from an injury.

3) You may have a birth defect, such as with the corpora cavernosa (the two spongy columns of tissue that hold blood which become engorged with blood and become hard during an erection).

4) If you are uncircumcised, your member may change shape or bend because of improper care of the skin while it is still attached to the glans.

12)

What does it mean if my scrotum is bigger on one side?

There are several reasons why one scrotum may be bigger than the other. These can include:

1) One testicle may actually be higher or lower than the other.

2) Recent or recurring trauma.

3) A recent or recurring infection.

4) A hernia that has recently occurred or is recurring.

5) Genetic modifications or birth defects.

6) Hydrocele (fluid in the sac that holds the testes).

7) Torsion of the testes.

These are just a few of the potential causes of the condition, but there may be many other potential reasons. If you have any of these symptoms or suspect that you may have them, you should see your doctor immediately.

13)

What does it mean if my scrotum is smaller on one side?

The scrotum should be roughly the same size on both sides. If there is a dark purple or black growth on one testicle, this may be a tumor called a teratoma. A teratoma is a tumor that contains elements of all three layers of development (ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm). These tumors can also produce their own hormones and can be benign or malignant (cancerous). If you have this condition, you should seek medical attention immediately.

14)

What does it mean if my testicles retract into my body?

Your testicles can retract into your body for a variety of reasons. The tunica albuginea (a thick fibrous sheath) holds the testicles in place by the spermatic cord. If this tunic loosens, the testicles can retract under the warmth of the body heat and pressure. Other potential causes include:

1) Prisons.

If you are a prisoner, it is natural for your testicles to retract due to fear of an upcoming harsh interrogation (not that I would know anything about that).

2) Your testicles have encountered a sudden drop in temperature.

Sudden changes in temperature can cause your testicles to retract into your body in an attempt to keep the testicles at a comfortable temperature.

3) You are mentally distressed or frightened by something or someone.

This is not a complete list of all the potential reasons why your testicles may retract, but it covers most of them. If you cannot find a reason for this occurrence, then see a doctor or medical professional immediately.

15)

What does it mean if I’m aroused by the thought of having a furry animal’s tongue in my bottom?

This is called zoophilia and it is a type of paraphilia (a condition in which a person has obsessive thoughts and habits involving extreme sexual acts). This may involve animals, objects, or other people. In your case, it most likely involves an animal. There are several potential reasons why you may have this condition.

1) Genetics.

It is possible that something may have been altered genetically while you were still in your mother’s womb or while you were a fetus. If your parents or any of your ancestors had any similar conditions, there may be a genetic link.

2) Brain Injury.

There are several portions of the brain that control different actions. If any of these portions are damaged or destroyed, then the action(s) controlled by the damaged portion will not work as efficiently or not at all.

For example, if the portion of the brain that controls the ability to sense pain is damaged or destroyed, a person may be prone to injuring themselves without realizing it and not feeling pain. It is also possible that the portion that controls sexual preference is damaged or destroyed. If this portion is damaged, there may be an increase in sexual preference. There are several other possibilities as well.

3) Abusive Parents or Caretakers.

It is possible that your parents or caretakers abused you in some way that caused this condition. This could involve anything from child abuse to sexual activity with an authority figure.

If this is the case, then you may have deep emotional scars from this and should seek help from a mental health specialist immediately.

As a side note, zoophilia is not the only condition involving animals. There is something known as zoomanity in which a person has an obsession with wolves.

This may involve dressing up as a wolf, collecting wolf-related items, writing stories about wolves, etc. There is also lycanthropy in which a person believes they are a wolf trapped in a human body and tries to act like one.

16) I am a teenager who has just found out that I have a paraphilia.

What should I do?

First of all, calm down. You are not a monster or some horrible person. You just have a condition that can be treated easily with proper therapy.

If you have not told anyone about your condition, then keep it to yourself for the time being. Depending on what your condition is, you do not want others to know.

Make an appointment with a psychiatrist as soon as you can. Do not let your parents push you into doing something you are not ready for, such as accepting yourself completely or going on anti-depressants.

The most common cause of concern for a person in your position is the fear of telling friends and family about your condition. If you are worried about this, keep in mind that in many, many cases the people close to the person have known about their condition for years and it has not changed anything between them.

Tell your friends and family that you have a condition and that you are seeing a psychiatrist because it is embarrassing to talk about. You do not need to go into detail about why.

If people push you to tell them what is wrong, then make something up. Lie.

Everyone does it and it is no worse than what most people will do to cover up their alcohol abuse or sexual encounters.

If your condition involves harming animals, then you should certainly tell someone about it immediately. Do not wait.

Even if you do not think you will act on your urges, the urge to do so can become too strong and you may hurt an animal that does not deserve it. Go to your family doctor or a mental health professional and explain your feelings.

Regardless of what your condition is, seek therapy right away. Do not think that you can just wait and see if your condition goes away with age.

Paraphilias are thought to be caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain, which would probably take years to correct itself even if you stopped the behavior that was causing it in the first place.

If you are reading this book, chances are you do not want to get treatment because you feel ashamed or embarrassed about your condition.

But, really, what is more embarrassing; admitting you have a problem or living with a condition that could potentially ruin your life?

That’s it. I hope this book has helped you in some way. I also hope that no one will ever see this book but you. If anyone finds out about your condition, it could cause you a lot of problems.

Remember, you are not alone. There are literally hundreds of people out there just like you.

Seek help and share your secret with someone you trust. You will feel much better when you do.

Good Luck.

Sources & references used in this article:

Efficacy and safety of penile girth enhancement by autologous fat injection for patients with thin penises by D Reuben – 2000 – Macmillan

Sexual selection in man and the great apes by DH Kang, JH Chung, YJ Kim, HN Lee, SH Cho… – Aesthetic plastic …, 2012 – Springer

Sexual abuse: what you must know by RV Short – Reproductive biology of the great apes: Comparative …, 1981 – books.google.com

Hypospadias, all there is to know by AR De Jong, SJ Emans, A Goldfarb – Patient Care, 1989 – go.gale.com