Sinus Massage: 3 Techniques to Relieve Pain

3 Techniques to Relieve Pain

1. Sinus Drain Maxillary Positioning

2. Sinus Tap

3. Sinus Tapping

4. Sinus Exhaustion Massage

5. Sinus Pressure Relief Technique (SORPT)

6. Sinoatrial Nerve Stimulation (SNNS)

7. Nasal Cavity Vascular Dilation (NCVD)

8. Lymphatic Drainment Massage (LDM)

1. Sinus Drain Maxillary Positioning

The sinuses are located in your throat and nose, which are connected to the nasal cavity through the nostrils. These organs are responsible for filtering out foreign substances from the air and dust particles. They also act as filters to remove dead cells and mucous from the body fluids such as blood, saliva, tears, etc. The sinuses help in removing toxins from the body fluids like phlegm and other secretions. When these functions are impaired or not working properly then there is a risk of developing various diseases including allergies, asthma attacks, chronic coughs and colds.

2. Sinus Tap

Sinus massage can be easily done at home through simple tapping and percussive techniques. Using your knuckles, simply tap on the bone just behind your cheekbones. You should feel a firm yet smooth surface and if you are fit enough you can reach all the way to the back of your head and tap on the top of your skulls interior. By doing this, the channels to your sinuses are opened allowing mucus and other trapped air to be released.

3. Sinus Tapping

Sometimes tapping is not enough to drain the mucus from your sinuses. In such cases you must perform Sinus Tapping by using your index, middle finger and your thumb to tap on the upper palate, just behind your teeth. As you tap use your other fingers to feel for and locate any swollen lymph nodes.

4. Sinus Exhaustion Massage

Sinus exhaustion massage is performed on the cheekbones. This technique involves pulling the cheekbones outward to help drain mucus from the paranasal sinuses. To perform exhaust tapping, hold your index finger against your cheekbone and pull outward as you apply pressure with your middle finger. The muscles of the mouth and face will feel rigid at first but as you continue to pull outward, the rigidity will begin to subside.

5. Sinus Pressure Relief Technique (SORPT)

SORPT is a technique that involves using your whole hand to apply pressure to the cheekbones. Use a gentle tapping motion with the heels of your palms while resting your fingers on the side of your face. Using your palms, pull the cheekbones outward. This will make you feel a good amount of pressure on your face. Hold this for about ten to fifteen seconds.

This technique should be repeated at least two more times. This technique will help in draining the paranasal sinuses while also helping to drain fluid from around the ears.

6. Sinoatrial Nerve Stimulation (SNNS)

SNNS stimulates the sinoatrial node, also known as the heart’s natural pacemaker. This can be done by placing the thumb on the centre of your wrist on the path from which the pulse originates. Then use your other index finger to apply pressure in a small circular fashion on either side of the pulse path about 1.5 cm away from the origin of the pulse.

As you apply pressure, you should feel a small numbness in your wrist. You can also use your middle finger in place of your index finger for this procedure. Hold the pressure for about twenty to thirty seconds and repeat this three to five times. This is a great technique to help drain the paranasal sinuses and helps to drain fluid from around the ears. This works well when used in combination with other exercises on this list.

Other factors that affect sinus health are lifestyle choices such as diet, sleep and smoking. Make sure you get enough rest, eat plenty of fruits and vegetables, avoid foods that trigger your allergies (such as dairy and wheat) and quit smoking.

Sources & references used in this article:

Stimulation of the carotid sinus nerve in treatment of angina pectoris by C Farrehi – American Heart Journal, 1970 – Elsevier

Relief of angina pectoris by electrical stimulation of the carotid-sinus nerves by E Braunwald, SE Epstein, G Glick… – … England Journal of …, 1967 – Mass Medical Soc

Apparatus and method for relieving sinus pain by W Werner – US Patent App. 12/015,397, 2008 – Google Patents

Abnormal cardiovascular responses to carotid sinus massage also occur in vasovagal syncope–implications for diagnosis and treatment by AM Humm, CJ Mathias – European journal of neurology, 2010 – Wiley Online Library

Glossopharyngeal neuralgia with syncope secondary to tumor: treatment and pathophysiology by TR Dykman, EB Montgomery, PD Gerstenberger… – The American journal of …, 1981 – Elsevier

Exaggerated carotid sinus massage responses are related to severe coronary artery disease in patients being evaluated for chest pain by CP Tsioufis, IE Kallikazaros… – … in the Treatment of …, 2002 – Wiley Online Library

Role of the glossopharyngeal nerve in the carotid sinus reflex in man; relief of carotid sinus syndrome by intracranial section of the glossopharyngeal nerve by BS Ray, HJ Stewart – Surgery, 1948 – surgjournal.com