Should You Add Honey to Your Coffee

Honey is not only used in making honeycombs, but it is also used in many other foods such as candies, cakes, drinks and beverages. Honey is a natural sweetener made from nectar of plants like beeswax or sugarcane juice. It contains no preservatives or artificial ingredients. Honey has been consumed for centuries throughout the world. It is often added to baked goods, beverages, and desserts. Honey is commonly used in baking because it helps with browning and keeping the bread moist. However, honey may have some negative effects on your body if you consume too much of it.

The main problem with consuming large quantities of honey is that it can cause bloating due to its high calorie content. Also, excessive consumption of honey can cause diarrhea. If you are pregnant or nursing, then consuming honey could result in low birth weight babies. Honey is also known to cause allergic reactions in some individuals.

It is best to avoid drinking any kind of alcohol while using honey as a sweetener since it might increase the risk of getting drunk from alcohol. Drinking coffee and tea with honey will help reduce the chance of getting intoxicated from these beverages. Honey is a good source of various nutrients such as copper, selenium, and magnesium. You have to consume large amounts of honey to gain its health benefits.

Never feed your baby any kind of honey since it can cause infant botulism in babies. Other possible side effects of honey include acid reflux, joint pain, irritable bowel syndrome, anxiety and sleep deprivation.

Is Caffeinated Honey A Good Bet?

Coffee and tea are beverages that are enjoyed by many, but sometimes you need a pick-me-up that has a little more umpf (a.k.a energy). While there are many caffeinated drinks out there such as soda, there are also others that you may not be aware of. One such beverage is caffeinated honey. While it may sound a bit strange, it can be a great substitute for that afternoon pick-me-up.

Sources & references used in this article:

Potential negative effects of exotic honey bees on the diversity of native pollinators and yield of highland coffee plantations by EI Badano, CH Vergara – Agricultural and Forest Entomology, 2011 – Wiley Online Library

Coffee and tea consumption and endometrial cancer risk in a population-based study in New Jersey by EV Bandera, MG Williams-King, C Sima… – Cancer Causes & …, 2010 – Springer

Local Honey by A Seale – Harrington Lesbian Fiction Quarterly, 2001 – Taylor & Francis

Is Honey Better For Your Blood Glucose Levels Than Sugar? by A Suresh – Reading Time, 2017 – wellthy.care

“Coffee plus Honey” versus “topical steroid” in the treatment of Chemotherapy-induced Oral Mucositis: a randomised controlled trial by MA Raeessi, N Raeessi, Y Panahi, H Gharaie… – … and alternative medicine, 2014 – Springer

” Persistent post-infectious cough” is better treated by which one? Prednisolone, Honey, Coffee, or Honey plus coffee: A meta-analysis by MA Raeessi, J Aslani, N Raeessi, H Gharaie… – 2014 – nopr.niscair.res.in

Raw Honey Benefits by WDHC From – holistickenko.com

Honey plus coffee versus systemic steroid in the treatment of persistent post-infectious cough: a randomised controlled trial by MA Raeessi, J Aslani, N Raeessi, H Gharaie… – Primary Care …, 2013 – nature.com

Protecting Paradise by M Honey, A Rome – Washington DC, Institute of Policy Studies, 2001 – vidasilvestre.org.uy