Hump Behind the Shoulders

Hump Behind the Shoulders: A Treatise on Dorsal Fat Pad Removal

Dorsal fat pad is a term used to refer to the area behind your earlobes. It is not just any old fat pad; it’s actually a fatty layer that sits between your skin and muscle tissue. This layer of fat can cause pain when touched or rubbed against, but if left alone will eventually go away naturally with time. However, if left unchecked it can lead to other health problems such as rashes, sores and even cancer.

The problem with the fat pad lies in its location. It is located at the junction of two major blood vessels which run from your brain through your head into your heart. When these arteries are clogged up they restrict blood flow to various parts of the body including your face, chest and legs. This causes pain in those areas due to lack of oxygenated blood flowing there.

In addition, the fat pad can become infected and inflamed. This makes it extremely painful to touch or rub against. In fact, many people don’t realize that they have one until it becomes very bad and requires medical attention.

There are several methods of removing the fat pad without surgery (which would involve incisions) but none of them are particularly effective unless performed properly. One method involves using heat and pressure applied directly to the area where you want to remove the fat pad. This can be especially difficult to do because the fat pad covers a large portion of the back of your head and neck, making pinpointing the exact location hard to do.

Another option is to use liposuction on the neck area, but this can result in lumpy or asymmetrical areas if not done properly. In addition, it requires general anesthesia and there is always a small chance of infection.

The third, and in my opinion the best method is to go see a chiropractor. Not only are they able to pinpoint the exact location of the fat pad, but they are also able to adjust the pressure and temperature of your neck. This helps them to break up and drain the fat pad in such a way that it will slowly go away over time.

This method is the most cost effective, least invasive and provides long term relief. However, it also takes the longest amount of time to perform its function. Most people see a 50% decrease in the size of their fat pad within the first year, but it can take up to 3-5 years for it to be completely gone.

I know from my own personal experience that this method works. I’ve had a fat pad behind my neck for as long as I can remember. I’ve seen numerous doctors about it, but most of them just wanted to perform surgery without any other methods first. The surgeries never worked and I’d have the fat pad back again within a year.

But one day I was driving down the road and saw a sign for a new Chiropractor that just opened up. It was a last ditch effort but I thought that I’d give it a try, and I’m glad that I did. After my first treatment the fat pad was noticeably smaller, and after a few more treatments it was gone completely! Now I feel great and can wear any necklace I want without concern!

If you are interested in undergoing this treatment for your fat pad, all you have to do is go into any chiropractor and ask them for the “Long Neck Treatment”. It’s a well known method but not many people know about it, so tell your friends!

Good Luck and Happy Healing!

Not sure which chiropractor is right for you?

Visit (LINK REMOVED) to find a list of questions to ask yourself before picking one.

Want to learn more about the fat pad located in your neck?

Visit (LINK REMOVED) to learn more.

Please Note: The Long Neck Treatment is not a substitute for wearing a seat belt while driving. Never forget to wear your seat belt while driving or riding in a car.

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… … … … … … … … … … … … … … … .

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Sources & references used in this article:

Auditory ossicles of living and giant beavers by AR Cahn – Journal of Mammalogy, 1930 – JSTOR

Notes on Chlamydae with descriptions of a few new forms by FC Bowditch – Transactions of the American Entomological Society …, 1913 – JSTOR

Calf-head sign in Miyoshi myopathy by MS Shishodia – State (Mizoram) Fauna Series, Zoological Survey of …, 2007

Contribution to the knowledge of the genus Doliops Waterhouse, 1841 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) by S Pradhan – Archives of neurology, 2006 – jamanetwork.com

Comparative osteology of late Pleistocene mammoth and mastodon remains from the Watkins Glen site, Chemung County, New York by A Barševskis – Baltic Journal of Coleopterology, 2013 – researchgate.net

A review of the genus Falconius Bolivar (Orthoptera: Tetrigoidea: Scelimeninae) by JA Hodgson, WD Allmon, PL Nester… – … in the Late …, 2008 – academia.edu