How to Do the Decline Bench Press

How to do the Decline Bench Press:

The decline bench press is one of the best exercises for building muscle mass and strength. It works your chest, shoulders, triceps, bicep, forearms and back muscles all at once.

You will get a great pump from doing it because you are working them together. Your arms will feel like they have been strengthened by being pressed down into the ground while your body gets used to pressing weight overhead again.

Decline bench press machines allow you to work these different areas with ease. They are available in many sizes and types.

Some of them even come with free weights attached so you don’t need any equipment. There are also decline benches that only include a barbell or dumbbells, but those require some extra time and effort to use properly.

There are several ways to perform the decline bench press. You can choose one of these methods and stick with it.

Or you can switch up your routine depending on what type of workout you want to do today. The choice is yours!

One thing that must be kept in mind when choosing which method to use is how much rest time between sets and exercises. For each of the following methods, rest two to five minutes between sets.

This allows your muscles time to recover before you do another set. It also prevents soreness and injury.

The first way to perform decline bench press is to use a barbell with weight plates on each end. These can be added or subtracted to increase or decrease the amount of weight that you are pressing.

It is very important to get proper instructions from a trainer or coach on how to properly and safely use this method. A lot of weight can be stacked on that bar, and if you don’t know what you are doing you could get hurt.

When using a barbell, you want to lie on the decline bench with your head at the top and your feet at the bottom so that your body is at a 45-degree angle. You also want to make sure that your head is comfortably upright so that it does not fall or hang off of the bench.

Your feet should be shoulder-width apart with your knees slightly bent. When you are in position, grab the barbell with an overhand grip and lift it off of the rack at a comfortable height for you. Keep your arms straight as you lift the bar so that your arms are directly vertical to the floor. This will be your starting position. Slowly lower the barbell to your chest while taking a deep breath in and then breathing out as you press the weight back up. All the while you should be focusing on squeezing your chest muscles so that they do most of the work. After you have fully contracted your muscles, slowly lower the bar back down to your chest.

The next way to perform decline bench press is to use an adjustable bench with free weights. You can use either a barbell or dumbbells.

The two methods used for this exercise are the same as the first method described. This allows you to be able to increase or decrease the weight by adding or removing weights on each side.

The third way to perform decline bench press is to use an adjustable bench with a set weight. This type of bench only has one spot to put a bar or dumbbells.

This is fine if you want to lift a specific amount of weight, but it may get boring if you want to increase or decrease the amount of weight that you lift.

The final way to perform decline bench press is to use a decline bench with only barbells. You lie on the bench with your head at the top and your feet at the bottom so that your body is at a 45-degree angle.

The great thing about this bench is that you don’t have to mess around with changing the weights because there aren’t any. The not-so-great thing about this bench is that it limits the amount of weight that you can lift.

There are many other types of benches and ways to perform these exercises. However, if you are a beginner, stick with one of these methods until you master them.

After that, you can try the different types of equipment and see which is best for you.

Sources & references used in this article:

Comparative evaluation of strength and electrical activity of the pectoralis major muscle during bench press exercise in horizontal, incline and decline Modalities by EC Crispiniano, MCSL Daltro, EM Nunes… – … Archives of Medicine, 2016 – imed.pub

Four in one exercise bench by RE Miller – US Patent 5,665,038, 1997 – Google Patents

Ergonomic weightlifting bench by JP Slattery – US Patent 6,565,495, 2003 – Google Patents

Muscle activity patterns do not differ between push-up and bench press exercises by JS Gottschall, B Hastings… – Journal of applied …, 2018 – journals.humankinetics.com