How to Do a Snatch Grip Deadlift, Plus Benefits and Safety Tips

Snatch Grip Deadlift Benefits:

The snatch grip deadlift is one of the most popular exercises among powerlifters. It’s great for building strength and size. However, it doesn’t have many benefits compared with other exercises like squats or bench press.

Some of the main reasons why this exercise isn’t used much are because it requires a lot of skill to perform properly, and there aren’t many good videos showing how to do them correctly. Another reason is that it takes a long time to build up enough strength to lift heavy weights. If you want to get stronger quickly, then you need to use different exercises such as the squat and bench press.

In this article, we’ll explain some of the benefits of snatching grip deadlifting which will make your training session more effective and efficient.

Benefits of Snatch Grip Deadlifts:

It helps you develop strength and muscle mass. It develops balance and coordination. You can improve your overall fitness level.

It improves your ability to recover from hard workouts due to its short recovery period (about 30 seconds). You don’t need any equipment like bands or chains to perform this exercise. A barbell is all you need! This exercise builds muscle without adding too much fat since it involves only bodyweight movements.

How to Snatch Grip Deadlift:

If you are new to deadlifting and snatching grip, it’s important to learn the movement pattern before adding weights. You should take it slow in the beginning and focus on good form. This will prevent from pulling a muscles or getting a back injury.

Steps:

Make sure you have a good bar pad or lifting belt to prevent injury to your back.

Place the bar about mid-shin and stand with your feet shoulder width apart.

Hook grip (over-under) the bar, making sure your hands are outside your legs.

Take a deep breath and bend down to grip the bar.

Un-rack the bar by straightening your legs. Keep a straight back and pull your shoulders back. Don’t bend at the hips.

Once you have pulled the bar off the rack, push your knees back and keep the bar close to your body as you stand up with it.

While standing straight, take a second to get your balance and prepare to start pulling.

Keep your head looking forward, don’t look up or down.

Breathe in as you pull the bar off the floor with all your muscles and breathe out as you pull it upward.

Take small steps as you pull the bar.

This will ensure better balance and more control over your body.

Keep your back arched and core tight.

As you pull the bar up, pull your shoulder blades back. This will keep your shoulders healthy and protect them from injury.

Finish the movement by standing fully erect and squeeze your glutes at the top of the movement.

You can then slowly lower the bar by bending your legs and keeping the back straight.

That’s one rep!

Note: If you can’t pull the bar from the floor in one single movement, you can perform what’s known as a deadlift bounce. This is where you pull the bar off the floor with your back and legs and as soon as the bar leaves the ground, you quickly pull it up with your glutes and hamstrings. This allows you to pull the bar from the floor without using your arms or shoulders.

How to Increase Weight:

As with most strength training exercises, your main goal is to increase the amount of weight you pull off the floor. You can do this by either adding more weight to the bar or getting better at the exercise. Let’s look at some options for increasing resistance when performing a snatch grip deadlift.

Adjusting the Weight

You can either add plates to a barbell or buy specialty bars that have smaller and more weight per bar. Here are some examples of specialty bars you can use:

1. Ohio Bar – This is one of the most popular barbells for Olympic lifters.

It’s great for training and meets all of the standards for quality. Plus, it’s one of the more affordable options, coming in at $300.00.

2. York Dumbbell Bar – This is a relatively rare bar that you don’t see in most gyms.

If you train at home, this is pretty much your only option. It’s nice because it has the same diameter as a regular Olympic bar, so it can fit into any power rack. Since it’s considered a specialty bar, it comes with more weight and is more expensive than a traditional bar, coming in at $415.00.

3. Alpha Bar – This is another specialty bar that’s the same diameter as a traditional Olympic bar.

The difference is it has an interior pin within the knurling, making it easier to perform exercises like pin pulls and dead stop lifts. It’s also one of the more affordable options at $350.00.

Adding Plates for Snatch Grip Deadlifts

No matter which bar you choose, you’ll also need to add plates. The good news is you only need to add one 10-pound plate per side, coming in at a total of $25.00 per side.

That means no matter which bar you choose, you can get a pair of them for under $100.00.

You should also consider getting two pairs since you’ll need them if you ever decide to perform snatch grip deadlifts with a traditional Olympic bar. It’s also a good idea to have a few pairs of 1.25-pound plates ($10.00 per pair) since you’ll need them on occasion.

Grip Options

If you don’t have thick bar handles, you can always wrap a towel around it. This allows for the bar to have some give in the middle which takes some stress off the hands and forearms.

If you don’t have an option for using thick bar, then that’s when you rely on 1.25-pound plates. Some people also prefer to use a spring collar to secure the plates on the bar.

It’s more of a pain in the butt to put on and take off, but it can be handy if you’re not regularly working with weights.

Wrap Up

As you can see, the snatch grip deadlift is an affordable exercise to perform at home. All you need is a bar and a couple pairs of plates.

Now that you know how to perform the exercise, here’s a sample workout you can try:

Sample Workout

Week 1

Exercise Sets Reps A Snatch Grip Deadlift 3 5 B1 Stiff Leg Deadlift 3 8 B2 Good Morning 3 10 C1 Glute Bridge 3 15 C2 Hanging Leg Raise 3 15

Week 2

Exercise Sets Reps A Snatch Grip Deadlift 3 6 B1 Stiff Leg Deadlift 3 10 B2 Good Morning 3 12 C1 Glute Bridge 3 20 C2 Hanging Leg Raise 3 20

Week 3

Exercise Sets Reps A Snatch Grip Deadlift 3 8 B1 Stiff Leg Deadlift 3 12 B2 Good Morning 3 15 C1 Glute Bridge 3 25 C2 Hanging Leg Raise 3 25

Week 4

Exercise Sets Reps A Snatch Grip Deadlift 5 5 B1 Stiff Leg Deadlift 5 10 B2 Good Morning 5 12 C1 Glute Bridge 5 20 C2 Hanging Leg Raise 5 20

Week 5

Exercise Sets Reps A Snatch Grip Deadlift 7 3 B1 Stiff Leg Deadlift 7 6 B2 Good Morning 7 9 C1 Glute Bridge 7 15 C2 Hanging Leg Raise 7 15

Week 6

Exercise Sets Reps A Snatch Grip Deadlift 10 2 B1 Stiff Leg Deadlift 10 5 B2 Good Morning 10 7 C1 Glute Bridge 10 12 C2 Hanging Leg Raise 10 12

Week 7

Exercise Sets Reps A Snatch Grip Deadlift 12 1 B1 Stiff Leg Deadlift 12 3 B2 Good Morning 12 5 C1 Glute Bridge 12 10 C2 Hanging Leg Raise 12 15

Week 8

Exercise Sets Reps A Snatch Grip Deadlift 15 1 B1 Stiff Leg Deadlift 15 3 B2 Good Morning 15 5 C1 Glute Bridge 15 10 C2 Hanging Leg Raise 15 15

Week 9

Exercise Sets Reps A Snatch Grip Deadlift 15 2 B1 Stiff Leg Deadlift 15 5 B2 Good Morning 15 7 C1 Glute Bridge 15 12 C2 Hanging Leg Raise 15 15

Week 10

Exercise Sets Reps A Snatch Grip Deadlift 15 3 B1 Stiff Leg Deadlift 15 5 B2 Good Morning 15 7 C1 Glute Bridge 15 12 C2 Hanging Leg Raise 15 15

After week 10, take a deload week. This can be a complete rest week or you can choose to do a modified version of the workout. The next workout, add 5-10% to each of the three main lifts and start over with week 1.

Sources & references used in this article:

Inside the Box: How CrossFit® Shredded the Rules, Stripped Down the Gym, and Rebuilt My Body by TJ Murphy – 2012 – books.google.com

How to Smooth Out the Kettlebell Snatch by M Beecroft, RKC Master, M Bos, A Du Cane, A Gala… – rkcblog.dragondoor.com

Mens sana in corpore sano by BS Pierre – mensetcorporesani.wordpress.com

A CrossFit Startup Guide: Part 2 by T Widman – CrossFit Journal, 2009 – library.crossfit.com

TRAINING THE HAMSTRINGS AND GLUTES by R Deadlift, GH Raise, LL Curl, G Mornings – alphaedgefitness.com