Everything You Need to Know About Buckwheat Honey

What Is Buckwheat Honey?

Buckwheat honey is a type of honey produced from the nectar of the plant called buckthorn (Cirsium arboreum). The name “buck” refers to its resemblance to a small, round cake. The word “honey” comes from the Latin word hodi meaning sweet and bee meaning worker.

The main constituents of buckwheat honey are:

1) Water – 75% or more

2) Buckthorn Nectar – 15% or less of total weight.

How To Make Buckwheat Honey?

You can make buckwheat honey with any method of making honey. However, there are some basic steps which are followed when producing buckwheat honey.

Step 1: Collecting Buckthorn Nectar From The Plant

Collecting the nectar from the plant is not easy task since it requires a lot of time and effort. But if you have access to the right kind of plants then you will surely get good results.

Step 2: Let The Nectar Ripen

The nectar needs to be ripened since the buckwheat honey you are going to get will not be ready if you harvest it in its raw state. This process can take from a few days to a week. If the nectar is too sweet then it may produce a very dark and thick honey, which may affect the quality of the final product.

Step 3: Begin Filtering The Nectar

Using a strainer, strain the honey from the plant. You should keep the honey in a safe, clean and dry place until you are ready to store it.

Step 4: Packaging

Most people would package the honey immediately after straining. Others may prefer to leave it for a few months since it is necessary to let it settle for some time. It will allow most of the water to evaporate from the honey.

Step 5: Store It

You can store your honey in any kind of container. You should only keep it in a dry and cool place. If you want to preserve it for a long period then you should make sure that there is no air or moisture that can contaminate the product.

In this way, you can get a high-quality buckwheat honey.

What Are The Different Types Of Buckwheat Honey?

A lot of people have this question in their minds and the answer to it is very simple. There are only two types of buckwheat honey. The first one is dark buckwheat honey and the second one is light buckwheat honey.

Dark Buckwheat Honey

The color of dark buckwheat honey can range from light brown to a dark brown. It also has a strong flavor. If it is not properly stored then it may even develop an acidic taste.

Light Buckwheat Honey

The color of light buckwheat honey is lighter than dark buckwheat honey. The taste is stronger than the other honey varieties. This type of honey may have the strongest taste among all the common types of honey in the market today.

How To Get Buckwheat Honey?

Like any other kind of honey, you can get buckwheat honey in a number of ways. The most common ways are discussed below.

Harvesting Wild Buckwheat Honey

Buckwheat flowers bloom for a long period of time. They bloom throughout the spring and summer. If you live in an area where there are a lot of buckwheat plants then you can easily harvest the nectar from them.

The way you do this is very simple. You only need to place a container under the flowers and then strain the liquid after a few hours.

Harvesting Domesticated Buckwheat Honey

You can harvest buckwheat honey in the same way as harvesting from wild plants. The only difference is that you will be using domesticated buckwheat plants. Also, domesticated buckwheat plants bloom for a shorter period of time.

They only bloom in the spring.

You need to place a container under the flowers and then strain the liquid after a few hours. Buckwheat honey tends to be dark in color.

Harvesting Heather Honey

You can harvest heather honey by placing a container under the flowers and then strain the liquid after a few hours. Heather flowers only bloom in the summer. Thus, if you are in an area that has a lot of heather plants then you can easily harvest the nectar.

Heather honey tends to have a very strong taste.

Harvesting Orange Blossom Honey

You can harvest orange blossom honey by placing a container under the flowers and then strain the liquid after a few hours. Orange flowers only bloom in the spring. If there are orchards in your area then you will have no trouble harvesting this delicious kind of honey.

Harvesting Sunflower Honey

You can harvest sunflower honey by placing a container under the flowers and then strain the liquid after a few hours. Sunflowers only bloom in the summer. If there are a lot of sunflowers in your area then you will have no trouble harvesting this delicious kind of honey.

Harvesting Tulip Honey

You can harvest tulip honey by placing a container under the flowers and then strain the liquid after a few hours. Tulips only bloom in the spring. If there are a lot of tulip fields or gardens in your area then you will have no trouble harvesting this delicious kind of honey.

Harvesting Walnut Honey

You can harvest walnut honey by placing a container under the flowers and then strain the liquid after a few hours. Walnut trees only bloom in the spring. If there are a lot of wild or domesticated walnut trees in your area then you will have no trouble harvesting this delicious kind of honey.

Harvesting Wild Flower Honey

You can harvest wild flower honey by placing a container under the flowers and then strain the liquid after a few hours. If there are a lot of different types of wild flowers in your area then you will have no trouble harvesting this delicious kind of honey.

Harvesting Wattle Honey

You can harvest wattle honey by placing a container under the flowers and then strain the liquid after a few hours. Wattle trees only bloom in the spring. If there are a lot of wattle trees in your area then you will have no trouble harvesting this delicious kind of honey.

Harvesting Yellow Hornet Honey

You can harvest yellow hornet honey by placing a container under the yellow hornet bees’ nest and then strain the liquid after a few hours. You can find the yellow hornet’s nest in trees. Be careful not to disturb the bees when you attempt to get the honey, though.

Homebrewing

You need to place water and some sort of fermentable material in your still for several hours or even days. This turns the sugars in the substance into alcohol. You do not want to boil the mixture because this will burn off the alcohol.

You can also use some of the following: fruit, honey, grain (such as corn), potatoes or even bread. Keep in mind that the sweeter the material, the less time you will have to leave it in the still. Also, the paler the material, the better.

You can also add some herbs for additional flavoring.

You can purchase a still at a local store or you can build one yourself. Keep in mind that it is illegal to distill alcoholic beverages without a license.

Making Beer

One of the easiest alcoholic beverages to make at home is beer. You could even use one of the regular beer recipes included in Chapter 10: Other Information of this book.

Making Wine

Wine is made from fermenting fruit juice or grapes. You can use an existing wine recipe in this book or come up with your own recipe. Keep in mind that the sugars in the substance must be fermented before you can drink it.

This will turn the sugar into alcohol. You will need to let this mixture sit for at least a month before it is ready to drink.

Making Spirits

It is illegal to distill alcoholic beverages without a license.

Making Moonshine

Moonshine is an illegal alcoholic beverage typically made in small batches in the United States. It is generally distilled from corn, although historically it has also been made from wheat, rye, barley, or whatever else could be used.

It is popularly believed that the term moonshine originated with the practice of the Appalachian Mountain people to hide illegal liquor production in the shadows of a moonlight. However, this is a recent folk etymology, and its accuracy is questionable. A more believable explanation is that the term derives from the fact that moonshiners typically worked at night to avoid legal trouble.

Purchasing Alcohol

If you want to purchase alcohol, you will have to do so at a local store. Make sure that you have your ID ready and be prepared to pay a lot for the alcohol taxes. You may also have an issue if you are underage.

I don’t recommend purchasing alcohol because it is dangerous and expensive.

Distilling Alcohol

The process for distilling alcohol is quite complex and you can damage your health by doing it wrong. You could even get arrested and fined by the government for manufacturing an illegal substance.

There are three ways to get alcohol: brewing, fermenting and distilling.

To start, you will need a recipe for alcohol. There are many different recipes out there for different types of alcohol.

Fermenting

One way to make alcohol is to ferment it. This is the easiest way for you to get alcohol but it also takes the longest time. You can use fruits, sugars or grains for this process.

You will need recipes for the alcoholic beverages that you want to make and you might have to buy additional ingredients from a store.

Keep in mind that you will have to do this process in secret if you want to avoid attention. Also, the longer the alcohol sits the worse it gets so you might not get the highest quality drink.

Brewing

The next way is brewing. This is a little more complicated than fermenting but it also leads to better quality alcohol. You can use fruits, sugars or grains for this process as well.

You will have to buy special equipment for this as well as more ingredients.

Distilling

The final way is distilling. This is the most complicated and dangerous way to make alcohol. You will need a recipe for alcohol, special equipment and a lot of knowledge about the process.

If you mess this up, you could damage your health and even cause explosions.

You might also want to try creating your own recipes for alcohol.

Step 1: Gather Your Ingredients

The first thing that you need to do is gather all of your ingredients. You will need fruits, sugars or grains as a base for your alcohol along with other ingredients for flavor. Try experimenting with different combinations to see what you like best.

Some of the recipes that you can try are listed below:

Cider

You will need apples for this recipe. You can also add other fruits to change the flavor. This is great if you live in an area where apples grow naturally.

4 pounds of apples

1 pound of brown sugar

1 gallon of water

1/2 teaspoon of yeast

Apples are rich in pectin, which helps thicken the cider and gives it a nice flavor. Pectin comes from the cell walls of the apples and acts as a natural preservative. You can use store-bought apples or you can gather your own.

Just make sure you only use organic apples and if you’re picking your own, make sure you don’t overdo it. Too many apples can cause issues when fermenting.

To start, wash all your apples thoroughly. Cut them up into small pieces and put them in a container that you can close so that insects and dirt don’t get into the container. Pour the gallon of water over the apples and let them soak for two days.

Add your pound of brown sugar to the mix and stir thoroughly. Pour in another gallon of water and stir again. You should start to see small bubbles forming.

This means that the fermentation process has begun.

Leave the container open (you don’t want the top on it because it needs to breathe) for 48 hours. You will see more bubbles forming and slowly rising.

After 48 hours have passed, add a half teaspoon of yeast. This will kick start the fermentation process again and you should see even more bubbles forming. Leave the container open for another 48 hours to allow the fermentation process to finish.

You may need to top up the container with a little water because as the alcohol level gets higher, the water level lowers.

After the second 48 hours have passed, the alcohol level should be between 4-7% and the cider will be ready. Drink it slowly because it will still be pretty rough. The longer you leave it, the more time the yeast has to do its work and the smoother it gets.

Grain Alcohol

Grain alcohol is a strong version of Ethanol that can be made without fancy equipment or even grapes or apples. This recipe is simple and has a very strong effect.

4 cups of water

1 cup of grain (wheat, rice or barley)

You will also need some kind of container that can be sealed to store the alcohol in and a bag or some kind of straining device.

Start by putting the grain into the container and pour the cup of water over it. Then, leave it alone so that the grain can soak up all the water. After 8 hours, drain all the water out of the container and put in four more cups of water.

Leave it alone again for 8 hours.

After 16 hours have passed, drain out all the water again. You should now have around half a cup of clear fluid that contains alcohol. Pouring this into a container with a little sugar and some kind of fruit will make it taste better.

Cleaning products

After a disaster, cleaning products become a lot harder to come across. Hard water leaves an unsightly white film on your kitchenware and sinks. You can remove this easily with a mixture of lemon juice and salt.

This also helps to remove the smell of rotten food from your kitchen and cutlery.

To make this blend, take equal parts of lemon juice and salt and mix thoroughly. Use a damp cloth to put a thin layer of the mixture on your cleaning surface and leave it for around ten minutes. Wipe off with a damp cloth and rinse with hot water.

Your kitchenware and utensils will sparkle like they’re new.

Disinfecting

Disinfecting your home isn’t just good for killing germs, it’s also good for warding off unwelcome visitors in the aftermath of a disaster. Thieves will be a lot less willing to break into a home that smells strongly of bleach. To make your own disinfectant, mix 7 parts water with 1 part bleach.

This mixture can be stored for long periods of time and used as necessary.

Lighting

During a crisis, you might find that you suddenly can’t rely on your old methods of lighting.

Sources & references used in this article:

Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium perfringens Occurrence in Kazakh Honey Samples by FA Robinson – Proc. melaleuca Symp. Fl. Dep. Agric. and Consumer …, 1981

Effect of honey bee (Apis cerana indica) pollination on seedset and yield of buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum. by B Maikanov, R Mustafina, L Auteleyeva, J Wiśniewski… – Toxins, 2019 – mdpi.com

Emergency Food Storage & Survival Handbook: Everything You Need to Know to Keep Your Family Safe in a Crisis by A Rahman, S Rahman – Indian Journal of Agricultural Science, 2000 – cabdirect.org

Discrimination and classification of beet and cane inverts in honey by FT-Raman spectroscopy by JM Martin – 2000 – Harmony