Essential Oils for Bruises

What happens when you get a bruise?

Bruising is one of the most common injuries that occur on your body. It’s also one of the most difficult to treat. There are many factors that can cause it, but there are two main causes: trauma (physical or emotional) and infection. Let’s take a look at each one individually.

Trauma

The first thing to remember is that if you’ve been hit hard enough, even minor bumps and bruises will turn into a larger bruise. If this isn’t the case, then you need to go see a doctor immediately! A bruise needs immediate attention because it could become infected and cause further damage.

So don’t wait around; get yourself checked out right away!

Here are some things that can cause a bruise:

Being struck with something hard like a fist, rock, bat, or other object. Being kicked or punched in the face. Getting hit in the eye with an open hand.

Falling down from too much excitement during sports activities such as football or basketball. Getting run over by a car while walking along the road. Getting caught up in a fight or altercation. Struck by lightning while standing near a tree branch.

Emotional

Emotional trauma can cause bruising in a very similar way that physical trauma can. The key difference is that emotional trauma, specifically stress, most often causes the skin to bruise underneath the surface of the skin. These kinds of bruises are called “contusions,” and they take longer to heal than typical bruises.

If you’re in an emotionally stressful situation, make sure to take extra care of yourself by eating well and getting enough sleep!

Infection

Infections can be caused by many things, but the most common is an animal or person who is sick, such as someone with the flu. If you have an open wound and come into contact with someone who has a cold, the flu, or some other sort of respiratory infection, you will most likely get infected by them as well.

Once infected, the skin around that area becomes more susceptible to bruising. If you get into a fight on top of being infected, you could end up with a contusion.

Stress

This is probably the most common cause of bruising around the face and eyes. Someone who is stressed out on a regular basis is more prone to getting bruised if they fall or get into an accident or altercation. If you know someone who is constantly under a lot of stress, be careful around them and try to keep them calm.

Acne

Sometimes people get acne around their face, especially during puberty when hormones are in full swing. Acne is caused by clogged pores that become infected and inflamed. While most people outgrow their acne as they get older, some people continue to suffer from breakouts into their twenties or even thirties.

If you suffer from acne, make sure to get a medicated face wash and cream to help prevent and treat future breakouts.

Tips:

Make sure to wash your face twice a day and apply lotion to keep the skin moisturized. Check your face for any signs of redness or breakouts and get medicated cream from a doctor if you see any sign of infection. Remember, what you put into your body is reflected on the outside!

Eat healthy and drink plenty of water every day to keep your skin looking youthful and fresh.

Prevention:

The best way to prevent getting a facial bruise is to not get into fights, fall, or get in accidents. Once you’re older and past the stage where you easily get into fights with your siblings or play sports, you’ll most likely never have to worry about getting a bruise on your face again.

Sources & references used in this article:

The Complete Book of Essential Oils and Aromatherapy, Revised and Expanded: Over 800 Natural, Nontoxic, and Fragrant Recipes to Create Health, Beauty … by J Lawless – 2013 – Conari Press

Combined application of essential oils from Origanum vulgare L. and Rosmarinus officinalis L. to inhibit bacteria and autochthonous microflora associated … by VA Worwood – 2016 – books.google.com

Commercial essential oils as potential antimicrobials to treat skin diseases by GA De Azeredo, TLM Stamford, PC Nunes… – Food Research …, 2011 – Elsevier