Can Using Nub Theory Reveal If You’re Having a Boy or a Girl

Nub Theory Test:

The nub theory test is based on the assumption that there are two types of human beings: boys and girls. The first type have only one X chromosome while the second type have two X chromosomes.

There are many theories about how these differences develop during fetal development. Some say that it’s due to genetic mutations, but others believe that it’s due to environmental factors such as hormones or even infections.

In order to determine if you’re having a boy or a girl, you need to take the nub theory test. The test consists of three parts:

1) A questionnaire which asks questions about your gender identity and sexual orientation.

2) An ultrasound image showing the size of your baby’s genitals (penis/vagina).

3) Your blood sample which will be tested for any abnormalities that may indicate whether you’ve had a boy or girl.

The results of the test will give you some clues about your gender identity and sexual orientation. The nub theory quiz will provide you with additional information about your own biological make up.

The ultrasound image and blood test results can be used as evidence, but the accuracy of the results can differ depending on several factors such as whether you have had a boy or girl before.

Nub Theory Boy

Some people may be familiar with the nub theory test which carries out the same process as above. However, in this case, part three of the test involves carrying out an amniocentesis or an autopsy on your baby after it has been born.

Nub theory boy is a much more accurate way of testing whether you are carrying a baby boy or a baby girl. The accuracy is increased by performing the test after the baby has been born.

The only major drawback of this theory is that it involves killing your own baby in the process.

How Does the Test Work?

In order to carry out the test, a needle is inserted into your baby’s brain to take a sample of its cerebral spinal fluid. In most cases, brain tissue from the needle implicates that you are carrying a baby boy. In other words, baby boys have brains and spinal tissue, while girls do not.

You can read more about the theory here.

Problems with the Nub Theory Test

There are a number of problems with the nub theory test. The major drawback is that it is very dangerous to insert needles inside your baby’s head.

Even if there are no physical complications during or after the procedure, there could be emotional and psychological effects which can stay with your child for the rest of their life.

In addition, the theory itself is very controversial. Some people argue that it should not be used to predict the gender of your baby as there are many other factors such as genetics and environment which can also affect gender.

Despite these problems, many doctors will use this method when determining the gender of a baby. They will insert one needle into the spinal cord to test for boyhood, and two needles for girldom.

Gender Prediction Ultrasound

An ultrasound can be carried out in order to determine the gender of your baby. There are two types of ultrasounds which can predict the gender of your baby.

These are known as the flood and the squirt methods:

The flood method involves the technician injecting a color altering fluid into the amniotic sac. If the fluid is able to flood the sac then you are most likely carrying a girl, whereas if the fluid cannot flood the sac then you are most likely carrying a boy.

The squirt method involves the technician injecting a color altering fluid directly into the baby’s bladder. If the baby urinates immediately after this process, then you are most likely carrying a boy.

If no urine is passed, then you are most likely carrying a girl.

The accuracy of these tests is much lower than other methods of predicting the gender of your baby. It is recommended that you do not use this test as the only method of determining your baby’s gender.

Gender Prediction Blood Test

Blood tests to determine the gender of your baby can be carried out from around week 15 of your pregnancy.

Sources & references used in this article:

Imagine there’s no woman: Ethics and sublimation by J Copjec – 2004 – books.google.com

Rhythm science by PD Miller, DJSTS Kid – 2004 – books.google.com

Mona in the Promised Land: A Novel by G Jen – 2012 – books.google.com